#victoryForPeace
  • Вернуться на главную
  • Написать нам
  • Карта сайта

Battle of monuments: Combating war memoriesMarshal Zhukov Replaced with 200 Bandera monuments

Valery ASRIYAN

Officials

Vladimir PUTIN, President of the Russian Federation,
"We never divided the victory into ours and someone else's"
Sergey Shoigu, Russian Defense Minister,
Eyes to the Victory!

History and Modernity

Valery IVANOV,
Revival of Nazism in Europe
Valery ASRIYAN,
Battle of monuments: Combating war memories
Valery Moshev,
A story of turncoats. Traitors that became heroes.
WORLD CELEBRATES VICTORY
Viktor Shestakov,
Sevastopol: the Sacred Symbol of Russia

Great Patriotic War

THE GREAT PATRIOTIC WAR, 1941 - 1945
BATTLE OF MOSCOW, December 1941
Vladimir Shepel, Director of Archive Of the Kazakh President,
Kazakhstan’s arsenal for the frontline
STALINGRAD, November 1942
BATTLE OF KURSK, July 1943
BATTLE OF THE DNIPER, Fall 1943
«OPERATION BAGRATION», Summer 1944
The Sons of the Transcaucasus on the Fronts of the Great Patriotic War
TAJIKISTAN'S FORGE OF VICTORY
MANAS DESCENDANTS IN THE BATTLE AGAINST NAZISM
ULUGBEK'S SUCCESSORS IN THE GREAT PATRIOTIC WAR
TURKMEN WARRIORS IN THE BOOK OF PEOPLE
Tatiana Kunina,
Deadly Fight for Pushkin
BLOCKADE OF LENINGRAD, September 1941 - January 1944
LIBERATION OF EUROPE, 1944 - 1945
THE BATTLE OF BERLIN, Spring 1945
RESCUE OF PRAGUE, May 1945
Vladimir Gall,
Spandau Fortress Gave in without Struggle…
VICTORY PARADE IN MOSCOW, June 24, 1945
LIBERATION OF MANCHURIA, August 1945
ORDER OF VICTORY
VICTORY WEAPONS
 
A monument to Soviet soldiers in Tallinn.
Removed from the city center in 2007

A monument to Soviet soldiers in Tallinn. Removed from the city center in 2007

The “Motherland Calls” monument in Volgograd

The “Motherland Calls” monument in Volgograd

A monument to Estonian SS veterans.
Erected in 2005

A monument to Estonian SS veterans. Erected in 2005

A Victory monument in Georgia.
Demolished in 2009

A Victory monument in Georgia. Demolished in 2009

The war against monuments, which began in Ukraine, as the new government came to power, has entered a new, more violent phase.

A bronze bust of Marshal Georgy Zhukov was removed from the pedestal in a park in Odessa, a park that is located on a street bearing the very name of the famous Soviet general. It is clear that the figure of the “Victory Marshal”, under whose command the Soviet troops crushed both the Nazis and their collaborators from the so-called Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UIA), displeases the present-day followers of Bandera and Shukhevych. However, those, who in the Russophobic frenzy fomented by the current Kiev authorities, are ready to destroy everything, which reminds them of the indissoluble ties with Russia, both Soviet or pre-revolutionary, do not care about the outstanding military leader who made a huge contribution to the victory over fascism and enjoys a truly international reputation.

A monument to Catherine II, erected in Odessa in 1900, is now also threatened with demolition. So what was so bad that the Russian Empress did to the city? Is it because the very city was founded by Catherine’s order in 1794, and became the largest Black Sea port - a sea gate of sorts, which opened the way to the West? One should show her eternal gratitude and decorate the monument with flowers, rather than demand its demolition. Alexander Pushkin, apparently, also did something to annoy the Odessa authorities. They probably can’t forgive the author of "Poltava" his truthful depiction of Hetman Mazepa, who betrayed Tsar Peter and his own people, having treacherously switched to the Swedish side. Probably, the current leaders of Ukraine, the Judas’ of today, have recognized Mazepa in themselves, and now want to get rid of the monument to Pushkin, which reminds them of their crimes.

Zhukov, Catherine the Great, Pushkin ... This is not even the full list of historical figures, who ended up in the objectionable category in today’s Ukraine. Books by "non-Aryan" authors were burned in Hitler's Germany by order of Goebbels. Ukraine now has its own Goebbels’ and Bormanns, who also remove "unnecessary" and "bad” books from libraries. But the main enemy of Ukrainian neo-Nazis is monuments and sculptures, probably because they are too conspicuous and present an obstacle to re-writing history. That is why last year in the city of Brody, in the Lviv region, a monument to the great Russian military leader Mikhail Kutuzov, a victor in the Napoleonic war, was demolished, while the crowd chanted Bandera’s famous slogan "Glory to Ukraine, Glory to the Heroes”. Obviously, Mikhail Kutuzov, who led the troops who liberated Russia and Ukraine from Napoleon, is now an objectionable figure for the current Ukrainian nationalists, just like Zhukov is. A monument to the Soviet Liberator Soldier was demolished in Stry, another city in the Lviv region. A monument to the Civil War hero Nicholay Shchors, is now also under threat of demolition.

The authorities in Kyiv have recently announced their intention to dismantle the monument to General Nikolai Vatutin, who commanded the 1st Ukrainian Front in the Great Patriotic War and freed the capital of Ukraine from the Nazis. Well, retired boxer Vitali Klitschko, now the mayor of Kiev, has a very peculiar way of expressing his "gratitude" to the Soviet general and liberator. Vatutin’s daughter, Elena Nikolaevna, received a suggestion to relocate the remains of her father to her homeland. Of course, any part of Russia would accept them, as it honors its heroes and keeps an eternal memory of them.

Meanwhile, Ukraine now cherishes the memory of a very different kind of "heroes", the kind that killed the liberator of Ukraine General Vatutin. After all, he was ambushed and killed by Banderovites, the Ukrainian Insurgent Army, together with the Nazis, fought the Soviets and committed terrible atrocities on the occupied territory. The names of the fascist acolyte Stepan Bandera and of his accomplice Roman Shukhevych are now being almost canonized in Ukraine. Over the last 23 years, since 1992, Ukraine has erected some 200(!) monuments to Bandera, who is officially proclaimed a hero of the struggle for "independence". The monuments range from small busts to bronze full-scale sculptures. At the same time, the names Bandera and Shukhevych, who are associated with monstrous crimes of Katyn and other brutal punitive actions committed on the territory of Ukraine, Belarus and Poland, are cursed by millions of Ukrainians. The hands of Banderovites are stained with the blood of tens of thousands of Russians, Jews and Poles.

The war against monuments is waged not only in Ukraine. It has long been going on in Poland, which produces more and more frontline news from this strange, no, sacrilegious war. Here are some of these reports. The monument to the Soviet soldiers was dismantled in the city of Katowice, while a monument of Gratitude to the Red Army was savagely smashed in the city of Limanowa. Well, why thank the Red Army, who sacrificed 600 thousand Soviet soldiers to liberate Poland from the Nazi occupation and save the Polish people from the complete enslavement and even physical destruction?  Apparently, this is how the Polish authorities think. And if this is how it is, they have to erase any reminder of the heroism of our liberator soldiers. And so the monuments are being destroyed and dismantled in order to rewrite history.

A year ago, the authorities of the Polish city of Pieniężno made a scandalous decision that caused controversy even in Poland itself, to dismantle the monument to General Ivan Chernyakhovsky, the commander of the 3rd Belorussian Front, who died in February 1945 in the battle for the liberation of the city. You see, the Soviet general is "guilty” of giving the order to destroy the militants of the so-called Armia Krajowa (“the Home Army”), which, while following the orders of the Polish Government in exile in London, attacked the Red Army, killed Soviet soldiers and Polish Communists, and terrorized the civilian population of Ukraine and Belarus. As Armia Krajowa is considered heroes in modern Poland, just as Banderovites in Ukraine, the monument to General Chernyakhovskiy should, of course, not exist. Although he was a Soviet general who gave his life, so that the German city Mehlsack could become the Polish Pieniężno.

The Baltic countries are also trying to erase all memory of the heroism of our soldiers. The monument to Soviet soldiers, known as the "Bronze Soldier" was demolished in Tallinn. Riga intends to take down the Victory Monument - a symbol of heroism of Soviet soldiers. The monument is very much an eyesore for the Latvian authorities, who have, apparently, forgotten, who the Latvian people owe their well-being and their freedom to. The only remaining Soviet monument in Vilnius, which depicts two soldiers, is constantly threatened by local vandals. From time to time, the vandals defile the moment with phrases, such as "Russians, out!", supplementing it with the images of a red star and a gallows. On New Year’s Eve, the "jokers" mockingly dress the soldiers in Santa Claus hats. The authorities of the Lithuanian capital don’t pay any attention to the "jokes" of these out-of-control Russophobes, apparently considering their actions as innocent fun.

We could cite many more examples of the immoral and barbaric war against monuments, no, against history itself, that is being waged not only in Ukraine, Poland and the Baltic States, but also in several other European countries. The war, that fits so well into the anti-Russian campaign launched under the Western pressure. But will it give the proponents of this shameful campaign the results they desire, will they be able to erase from human memory all that they associate with Russia, its achievements, history and culture? This is unlikely. An example of how one should treat historical monuments was demonstrated by the Russian soldiers, when they entered Paris following the victory over Napoleon in 1814. When they realized that the supporters of King Louis, who had regained the throne with the help of foreign bayonets, together with the Austrians and Prussians, want to demolish the Vendome Column, a symbol of Napoleon's victories (including the one over the Russian army!), a unit of Cossacks prevented them from doing so, and put up a special outfit for the protection of the monument. This act by the Russian soldiers is an example of a true winner’s nobility, which is still remembered in France.

 

Heroic Pages

Brest Fortress Defenders
Heroes of the Panfilov Division
The medal of the Hero of the Soviet Union
Defense of Sevastopol
The Feat of Alexander Matrosov
12 Soviet Hero cities

Allied Effort

THE FIRST VICTIMS OF WAR
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE UNITED NATIONS
14 GREAT VICTORIES
ALLIED ASSISTANCE AND SUPPORT
WWII ALLIES
ALLIES IN IRAN, 1941 – 1945
RESISTANCE MOVEMENT
THE NORMANDIE-NIEMEN AIR REGIMENT
BROTHERHOOD OF ARMS
Victory in Afghanistan
COALITION THAT UNITED THE WORLD
ELBE DAY
PACIFIC VICTORY
Zhu De, Marshal “Red Virtue”
INTERNATIONAL CONDEMNATION OF NAZISM
RUSSIA REMEMBERS AND MOURNS: THE PRICE OF VICTORY