#victoryForPeace
  • Вернуться на главную
  • Написать нам
  • Карта сайта

Victory in Afghanistan

Alexander Knyazev, Director of the regional affiliate of the CIS Institute in Bishkek, Doctor of historic science, professor of the Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University

Officials

Vladimir PUTIN, President of the Russian Federation,
"We never divided the victory into ours and someone else's"
Sergey Shoigu, Russian Defense Minister,
Eyes to the Victory!

History and Modernity

Valery IVANOV,
Revival of Nazism in Europe
Valery ASRIYAN,
Battle of monuments: Combating war memories
Valery Moshev,
A story of turncoats. Traitors that became heroes.
WORLD CELEBRATES VICTORY
Viktor Shestakov,
Sevastopol: the Sacred Symbol of Russia

Great Patriotic War

THE GREAT PATRIOTIC WAR, 1941 - 1945
BATTLE OF MOSCOW, December 1941
Vladimir Shepel, Director of Archive Of the Kazakh President,
Kazakhstan’s arsenal for the frontline
STALINGRAD, November 1942
BATTLE OF KURSK, July 1943
BATTLE OF THE DNIPER, Fall 1943
«OPERATION BAGRATION», Summer 1944
The Sons of the Transcaucasus on the Fronts of the Great Patriotic War
TAJIKISTAN'S FORGE OF VICTORY
MANAS DESCENDANTS IN THE BATTLE AGAINST NAZISM
ULUGBEK'S SUCCESSORS IN THE GREAT PATRIOTIC WAR
TURKMEN WARRIORS IN THE BOOK OF PEOPLE
Tatiana Kunina,
Deadly Fight for Pushkin
BLOCKADE OF LENINGRAD, September 1941 - January 1944
LIBERATION OF EUROPE, 1944 - 1945
THE BATTLE OF BERLIN, Spring 1945
RESCUE OF PRAGUE, May 1945
Vladimir Gall,
Spandau Fortress Gave in without Struggle…
VICTORY PARADE IN MOSCOW, June 24, 1945
LIBERATION OF MANCHURIA, August 1945
ORDER OF VICTORY
VICTORY WEAPONS
 
Former Bukhara governor Seyid Alim-khan received from the Soviet intelligence large monetary sums in exchange for his refusal to cooperate with pro-German forces in Afghanistan.

Former Bukhara governor Seyid Alim-khan received from the Soviet intelligence large monetary sums in exchange for his refusal to cooperate with pro-German forces in Afghanistan.

We can state with conviction: by 1940 Afghanistan became an object of special attention on the part of Germany as a potential bridgehead on the approaches to British India, Chinese Turkestan and Soviet Middle Asia. But joint activity of the Soviet and British intelligence services prevented Hitler’s plans from coming true.
Ten years prior to the start of the Great Patriotic War, on June 24, 1931, the U.S.S.R. and Afghanistan concluded a treaty on neutrality and mutual non-aggression that obliged the sides to ban the existence on its territory of groups hostile to the other side. Relative quiet established on the Soviet-Afghan border. A relative quiet, as Nadir-shah’s successor on the Afghan throne was his son Mohammad Zahir Shah, who had no resources to overcome the traditional Afghan social and political atomism. This also entailed the probability of using Afghanistan’s territory for subversive activities against neighboring countries – first of all the U.S.S.R. and British India.

By 1940 Afghanistan became an object of special attention on the part of Germany as a potential bridgehead on the approaches to British India, Chinese Turkestan and Soviet Middle Asia.

German special services attached great significance to the religious factor: there were plans to allocate a considerable part of “troop mullahs” trained in Germany under the leadership of Jerusalem Mufti Haj Amin al-Husseini for work with the local population in Afghanistan and India.

Although the key thing in the Axis countries’ Afghan policy was the British direction, London agreed with Stalin’s proposal to conclude between the Soviet and British intelligence services an agreement on cooperation against Germany “in all parts of the world.”

The Soviet foreign intelligence had to join efforts with the Intelligence Service to carry out a long-term operation to eliminate Abwehr’s agents.

Back in 1938, Rome started supplying with weapons rebels on the territory of the Northwest Frontier Province of British India. In the same year, an armed march of Pashtoon tribes in regions adjacent to Afghanistan started which was aimed against Britain.

The first successful operation of Germany’s Abwehr in the zone of “independent” tribes of British India was a 1938 provocation on the Afghan-Indian border, nicknamed Shami Pir’s adventure. This operation showed that eastern Pashtoons can easily be used both against Kabul and against Britain. The key figure of the German agent network in Afghanistan was representative of the Sufi Order, Al-Qadiriya Mohammad Seyid Geylani, known as Shami Pir. He was a distant relative to Afghan emir Amanullo-khan deposed in 1929.

In June 1938, Geylani called on the tribes of the northwestern part of Pakistan to make a march on Kabul to restore the power of emir Amanullo-khan. The situation in Afghanistan’s south was threatening. The British offered Geylani a reward of 25,000 pounds sterling, and he agreed and surrendered June 30 to the British authorities, after which they delivered him to Baghdad. British secret services had no proof testifying to Geylani’s cooperation with fascists, although they suspected Germany stood behind him.

The British intelligence put Geylani under surveillance, and in spring 1939, the British registered his close contacts with an Abwehr resident.

For the Soviet Union, the actions of the Axis countries in Afghanistan also presented a large threat. Large forces of Middle Asia natives hostile toward Soviet power, were on the territory of Afghanistan. The first to start work among Middle Asia emigrants was Japan that craved to unite the forces of Afghan Basmach resistance with the Pan-Turkist movement in Chinese Xinjiang hostile to the U.S.S.R. On a request from the Japanese side in 1936, German agents, under the personal leadership of envoy to Kabul Kurt Zimke, delivered a large batch of arms to Xinjiang.

In 1935, Tokyo proposed to the Afghan leadership to conclude a secret agreement against the U.S.S.R., in line with which the Afghan side would undertake commitments to contribute to Japanese in carrying out spy and subversive activities from their territory against the Soviet Union, and Japan promised Afghanistan “patronage” and military aid in case the U.S.S.R. attacked.

Soviet spies in Kabul were able to obtain information on Japan asking Afghanistan to deploy the maximum possible number of troops on the border with the U.S.S.R. to distract the Red Army forces from the Far Eastern border. This action uncovered by the Soviet intelligence caused a big diplomatic scandal, and Germany had to withdraw its envoy from Kabul.

Japanese intelligence actively drafted Uzbek emigrants near Khanabad, established contacts with ex-emir Seyid Alim-khan and the key leaders of the Basmach resistance – Turkmen – Kyzyl Ayak, Uzbek – Makhmud-bek, Kurshir-mat and others.

In 1938, Soviet envoy Konstantin Mikhailov reached an agreement with Afghan Prime Minister Khashim-khan, in line with which the Afghan government committed itself to prevent Japanese nationals from entering northern provinces. Besides, a borderline 30-km zone was established, and all foreigners were banned from entering it. Foreign airlines were not allowed to open airlines in North Afghanistan or cross the zone. The 1938 agreements played an important role in frustrating the plans of the Axis countries to use Afghan territory as a bridgehead for activity aimed against the U.S.S.R.

Germany’s attack on the U.S.S.R. sharply changed the moods of the Afghan elite. A group of military led by Prince Mohammad Daud even worked out a plan of a military expedition to the Soviet territory: it was presumed that most units of the Red Army from Middle Asia would be transferred to the Western Front, which would simplify the task of “liberating” Bukhara, Fergana and entire Turkestan.

Basmach raids from Afghanistan’s territory to Soviet Middle Asia resumed. German residents tried, first of all, to organize relations with leaders of the Turkmen Basmach resistance, the most numerous, well-armed and bellicose. In August 1941, Kizil-Ayak sent to Khashim-khan a letter in which he asked to take Bukhara under Afghanistan’s patronage and reported the readiness to deploy 40,000 armed Turkmen for its “liberation.” In reality he had at his disposal no more than 10,000 people.
In November 1941, Basmach leaders invited to Kabul because Loya Jirga promised to Premier Khashim-khan to deploy 200,000 fighters in case Afghan troops entered the U.S.S.R. And he gave an order to hand out weapons to part of emigrant formations near the Soviet-Afghan border.

At the same time, the intelligence services of Germany and Japan were engaged in active work to restore agent connections among Middle Asian emigration. In September 1941, Uzbek Basmach leader Makhmud-bek started the formation of Abwehr’s strongholds in Baglan and a bit later in Kunduz to transfer subversive groups to the Soviet territory. By spring 1942, he created an organization called by Abwehr “Union”, whose aim was to return the Bukhara throne to Seyid Alim-khan. But the former emir himself took an expectant and cautious position.

In 1942, Makhmud-bek was arrested by Afghan police on demand from the British Embassy. This disorganized emigrant circles for a short period, but in summer a new organization, “Faal”, was created. The ex-emir and his son Umar-khan started cooperating with it. Preparations for a march to Bukhara planned for summer 1943 started. From the German side, at a base near Wroclaw in Poland, training of Turkestan Legion detachments was underway. The legion was made up of traitors and Red Army prisoners of war of Middle Asian origin, who were to be deployed to Soviet Middle Asia.

But this large-scale activity was constantly controlled by the Soviet and British intelligence services. Moreover, by that time, Soviet special services managed to arrange “contacts” with ex-emir Seyid Alim-khan, who started receiving large monetary awards from the Soviet side for his passiveness.

After a powerful demarche of two embassies, the Afghan government was forced to fulfill the demands of Britain and the U.S.S.R. In April-June 1943, the Kabul police arrested emigrants from Middle Asia, and the activity of pro-German groupings gradually faded away. In this way the attempts by the Axis countries to turn Afghanistan into a bridgehead for an invasion of the U.S.S.R. fell flat.

 

Heroic Pages

Brest Fortress Defenders
Heroes of the Panfilov Division
The medal of the Hero of the Soviet Union
Defense of Sevastopol
The Feat of Alexander Matrosov
12 Soviet Hero cities

Allied Effort

THE FIRST VICTIMS OF WAR
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE UNITED NATIONS
14 GREAT VICTORIES
ALLIED ASSISTANCE AND SUPPORT
WWII ALLIES
ALLIES IN IRAN, 1941 – 1945
RESISTANCE MOVEMENT
THE NORMANDIE-NIEMEN AIR REGIMENT
BROTHERHOOD OF ARMS
Victory in Afghanistan
COALITION THAT UNITED THE WORLD
ELBE DAY
PACIFIC VICTORY
Zhu De, Marshal “Red Virtue”
INTERNATIONAL CONDEMNATION OF NAZISM
RUSSIA REMEMBERS AND MOURNS: THE PRICE OF VICTORY